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Project Synopsis Liquefied natural gas (LNG) Combined Cycle Power Generation
Combined Cycle Power Generation :


The gas turbine (Brayton) cycle is one of the most efficient cycles for the conversion of gas fuels to mechanical power or electricity. The use of distillate liquid fuels, usually diesel, is also common as alternate fuels. More recently, as simple cycle efficiencies have improved and as natural gas prices have fallen, gas turbines have been more widely adopted for base load power generation, especially in combined cycle mode, where waste heat is recovered in waste heat boilers, and the steam used to produce additional electricity. This system is known as a Combined Cycle.

The basic principle of the Combined Cycle is simple: burning gas in a gas turbine (GT) produces not only power - which can be converted to electric power by a coupled generator - but also fairly hot exhaust gases. Routing these gases through a water-cooled heat exchanger produces steam, which can be turned into electric power with a coupled steam turbine and generator.

This type of power plant is being installed in increasing numbers round the world where there is access to substantial quantities of natural gas. A Combined Cycle Power Plant produces high power outputs at high efficiencies (upto 55%) and with low emissions. It is also possible to use the steam from the boiler for heating purposes so such power plants can operate to deliver electricity alone or in combined heat and power (CHP) mode.